IT leaders and mentor programs for ‘brogrammers’

These new employees are rejecting the old title of geeks in favor of a more social-focused image, as CIO and IT managers are beginning to see a shift in the type of worker that is applying for open positions.

There is a new breed of people who are working in IT jobs, and many leaders are having difficulty adjusting their managerial styles to the influx of “brogrammers,” CIO Canada reported.

According to the news outlet, these new employees are rejecting the old title of geeks in favor of a more social-focused image, as CIO and IT managers are beginning to see a shift in the type of worker that is applying for open positions.

An article in Bloomberg Businessweek outlined how the recent influx of “brogrammers” has led to a change in the perceptions of people who are working in IT jobs, as the party-hard, play-hard mentality is entering into parts of the tech sector that it had not previously existed in.

The article noted that the jobs of a programmer and other IT positions still require enormous brainpower, but the people who are filling these jobs are now coming from diverse backgrounds and changing the culture in tech offices around the world.

“I don’t need to wear a pocket protector to be a programmer,” John Manoogian III, a software engineer and entrepreneur, told Bloomberg.

This is a trend that is not something that is likely to change anytime soon, as the sector is attracting talent from all over to fill a growing number of jobs.

“There’s a rising group of developers who are much more sociable and like to go out and have fun, and I think brogramming speaks to that audience,” Gagan Biyani, co-founder and president of Udemy, told the news outlet.

The negative stigma – for some applicants – that had turned people off to tech jobs in the past could be something of the past, as the jobs are being filled by a more diverse group of individuals.

CIO Canada reported that employers have to adjust the way that they are going to deal with their programming team, as it will likely no longer consist of individuals who are introverted and unlikely to actively pursue social matters.

According to the news source, the move to a more social job environment is something that could benefit programmers, as they could begin to reap some of the benefits that come from the exposure of hard work and making a company a significant amount of money. This could also help IT departments with customer interaction and influencing executives.

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